Welcome

Flow is a cooperative gallery owned, operated and curated by artists, offering for sale the best of local and regional crafted objects and arts, traditional and contemporary.

Hours & Location

Jan-Apr Wed-Sat

May-Dec Tues-Sat


10:00 am – 4:00pm

or by appointment

 

PO BOX 923

14 Main Street

Marshall, NC 28753

828.649.1686

flowmarshall@gmail.com

Show Your Work at Flow

 

Get Newsletter

Now at Flow


Madison County

Past & Present

Photography by Rob Amberg


Ekho, PawPaw, Madison County, NC 2013

Nationally known Madison County photographer Rob Amberg has spent 40 years documenting, in his haunting black and white photographs, the lives of the people of his adopted region. 


                                                   

 


Visa MasterCard American Express

We ship! Call or stop by to make arrangements...

                     

Connecting Threads

A clothing designer talks about process, from thread to garment

Lisa Mandle to speak at Flow July 10 at 6 pm

 


Lisa's background in both visual and performing arts has informed professional experience in a variety of design and art fields. A MICA graduate in drawing and painting, she has worked as costumer, custom designer and assistant designer/pattern maker before moving to Marshall in the mid 90's. Since then she has continued to produce her designs in small collections or as one of a kind pieces, providing women of all shapes and sizes the opportunity to feel comfortable and beautiful in their clothing.

 The work to be discussed during Lisa's talk at Flow was created for the Project Handmade Fashion Show at the Asheville Art Museum in October of 2012, through Handmade in America and Local Cloth of Asheville.

It has been the connection to land and place that has deepened my appreciation for the 'slow' movements today, in food and in cloth. Collaborating with local weaver and colleague Selinde Lanier afforded an opportunity to experience 'slow' cloth intimately. The fashion show at the Asheville Art Museum brought us together to produce the work, but the story behind and inside of weaving the cloth and making the garments is a story that deserves telling.